How can you stay motivated during online school?

Crafting your own daily routine can increase your productivity and decrease stress. A plan for the day helps you visualize your goals and keep track of the fun things you want to do.

Here are four simple steps to organize your agenda for the day!

1. Decide your priorities

First, think of the most important classes to you. These are the classes you want to spend time on the most.

For example, as a pre-med, prioritizing my science GPA is important for medical school. This means I have to focus more on Anatomy and Physiology than Art class.

Photo by Andrew Neel on Pexels.com

Next, think of family responsibilities. For example, think of essential chores like cleaning your room, cooking, or babysitting your younger siblings.

Don’t forget to make time for the people you love most!

Schedule down time with your family. Eat dinner together or play board games with your siblings in replacement of social media.

Take time to chat with your friends and make sure they are doing fine because online classes can be especially hard for some.

Lastly, think of MAKING TIME FOR YOURSELF.

Put in quiet time to listen to music, read a book, or work on your creative hobbies like painting, playing the guitar, or writing.

Schedule a workout for 20 minutes three times a week and get 9 hours of sleep!

2. Pick a time

Photo by Vlada Karpovich on Pexels.com

Write or create a spreadsheet of 30 or 45 minute time blocks of your schedule.

Click to view the 30 and 45 min time block spreadsheet

The 45 minute time block is a method of time blocking in which you dedicate 45 minutes to accomplish a task then take a 15 minute break after. For example, I can work on my notes for Precalc for 45 minutes and then read a book or work on my Spanish (Duolingo) for 15 minutes.

The 30 minute time block is for shorter goals. For example, you can break up a larger chapter reading into part one and two. This way you can divide larger tasks into more manageable chunks.

The 30 minute method can help you in writing. You can begin a draft for 30 minutes, take a walk or do something else and work on it again after. This method helps decrease writing fatigue.

3. Write it out

Photo by Jess Bailey Designs on Pexels.com

Write out your schedule or print them using a spreadsheet.

You can even create your own through Canva or Adobe Spark.

On top of a schedule, I have a daily task list to check off if I met my goals. You can write your daily task list on a notepad or a planner.

Happy Planner planners

4. Stick to it!

Photo by Wictor Cardoso on Pexels.com

Make sure to commit to your daily to-dos and always keep in mind your semester and long term goals. By focusing on long term goals you have a purpose and motivation to stick to your daily goals.

For example, if you want a 4.0 GPA by the end of the semester, you need to commit yourself to doing the class’ daily readings and assignments.

The last thing to remember is to enjoy the present and not worry about the future. Set yourself up for success today and don’t worry about tomorrow.

Most importantly, find the fun in seemingly boring tasks.

Life is a journey, not a destination.

– Ralph Waldo Emerson

Conclusion

  1. Decide your priorities – family, school, personal
  2. Pick a time – time blocking 30 or 45 minutes for a task
  3. Write it out – write goals and to-do lists in a planner or print it out.
  4. Stick to it! – commit yourself everyday to your goals and have fun!
Posted by:Bianca Soriano

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s